Tribal Resource Center

NDN Collective Community Action Fund Grants Due in October

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Local assistance and tribal consistency fund deadline October 31

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2022 Indigenous Connectivity Summit (ICS) 10/24-10/28

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National Tribal Broadband Grant (NTBG) Deadline October 17th

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Indigenous Communities Program Funding application due 9/30

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Enabling Middle Mile Broadband Infrastructure Application Due September 30

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Financing mechanisms for locally-owned internet infrastructure report webinar 9/22

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NTTA Tribal Broadband Summit 9/19-9/20

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Capital Projects Fund application directions (deadline extended)

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Unlicensed Frequency

In the United States, the FCC defines regulations for unlicensed bands as 902 to 928 MHz and 2400 to 2483.5 MHz.

Licensed Vs. Unlicensed

LicensedUnlicensed
License required to be purchased License is free
Medium can be accessed\used only by the owner of the license Unlicensed spectrum and its medium can be accessed\used by anyone
Permission is required for transmission or reception and scheduling Anyone can access the medium if channel is empty
Interference management is carried out by careful frequency planning Interference management can be done using various techniques such as distributed management
Advantages- The benefits of licensed spectrum is known and predictive interference Advantages- Free or low cost to use, available nearly everywhere, scalable
Disadvantages- high costs for network operators, requires central management, low scalability Disadvantages- Unpredictable interference (due to lack of QoS), Higher load, Lack of protection from interference due to other systems

For FCC Basics of Unlicensed FCC Basics of Unlicensed
Transmitters click here.

For the National Association of Broadcasters Engineering Handbook, click here.

Which Unlicensed Frequency is Best for Your Industrial Wireless Network?

Radio Frequencies & Your Industrial Wireless Network

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